War of words erupts at nuclear disarmament talks

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During a Congressional hearing on Tuesday, U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis voiced his concerns over the North's nuclear program, stating that its nuclear program is a threat to global security. The regime continues to work on its ballistic missiles and nuclear programs.

In an opinion article later published by The Washington Post, Cha said that the Trump administration was considering a limited "bloody nose" strike against North Korea, warning that such a tactic could escalate "into a war that would likely kill tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of Americans". Talks between the two nations via the diplomatic stage have fallen apart recently. "But we'll see what happens".

The address was partially overshadowed, however, by the news that the White House had withdrawn the candidacy of the expected USA ambassador to South Korea, academic Victor Cha.

North Korean diplomat Ju Yong Chol predictably objected to the US characterization of its nuclear development program, saying the USA envoy made "unacceptable references to the self-defense nuclear deterrent of the DPRK".

"Then we're living in a new world, in which technically competent countries with adequate command structures are possessing nuclear weapons in an area where there are considerable national disagreements", Kissinger explained.

It is truly unfortunate that the USA is renewing its attention to its nuclear arsenal, after eight years.

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North Korea a year ago tested the Hwasong-15, a ballistic missile, which experts believe is capable of reaching USA mainland, though the country isn't believed to be able to mount a nuclear device on the missile.

We most certainly welcome China's assurance.

Pyongyang is under tightening economic embargo that has been imposed courtesy of the U.S. government and the UN General Assembly.

North Korea tested its first intercontinental ballistic missile, the Hwasong-14, twice last July.

He will hold symbolic events of his own to highlight the North's human rights abuses and nuclear ambitions, according to White House officials who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to preview the trip publicly. The last time there was such a review was in 2010 under President Barack Obama, when traditional nuclear rivals U.S. and Russian Federation agreed to steadily reduce their nuclear stockpiles and the Cold War came to an end. The UN General Assembly also passed a resolution to impose economic sanctions in a bid to achieving a fully denuclearized Korean peninsula which has been under high tensions since the end of the Korea War which ended in an armistice in 1953.

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