Saudi king calls for anti-corruption units five months into purge


Also, Saudi Arabia raked in almost $107 billion from the almost three-month old crackdown, which continues to be shrouded in mystery as the Saudi government has not released any details of the high-profile arrests and ensuing settlements.

The newspaper said at least 17 detainees were hospitalised after facing abuse, while a Saudi general later died in custody with what witnesses said appeared to be a broken neck.

Most have since been released but they are hardly free.

"We signed away everything", said a relative of a former detainee, who has been forced to wear a tracking device.

"I would guess it is about evens that there will be no global IPO", one high-level source said, according to the agency.

The announcement comes as a New York Times report has suggested that numerous assets of the 381 princes, ministers and tycoons have yet to be seized while more than a dozen of the detainees were abused while they were held.

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The state has also reportedly taken "large sums" and real estate from Mohammed al-Tobaishi, former head of royal court protocol; Fawaz Alhokair, a businessman; Khalid al-Tuwaijery, former chief of the royal court; Adel Fakieh, former economic minister; and Dabbagh, a businessman who once oversaw the country's foreign investment authority. His skin showed other signs of physical abuse, the person said. Officials questioned by the paper under strict conditions of anonymity revealed that a doctor and two other people briefed on the condition of the body of Al-Qahtani reported that it had burn marks that appeared to be from electric shocks.

The government on Sunday said Saudi King Salman had ordered the creation of specialised anti-corruption units in the public prosecutor's office to investigate and prosecute graft cases.

Gen. Qahtani, an officer in the Saudi National Guard who was believed to be about 60, was not wealthy himself, so his value as a major anti-corruption target is questionable.

The members of King Abdullah's family are seen as rivals of Crown Prince Mohammed and his father, King Salman.

He was returned to the hotel for further interrogation, and later pronounced dead at a military hospital.

The king's decision came from "his concern over combating corruption in all its forms aiming to protect the homeland and its resources, maintain public money and protect the integrity of the public employment", according to Saudi state media.