United States retailer Gap apologises for 'erroneous' China map printed on a T-shirt

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United States fashion retailer Gap became the latest giant corporation to apologise to China for selling a T-shirt with an "incorrect" map that did not feature Taiwan and other territories it claims.

The Gap map also did not reflect Chinese claims to territory in the northeastern Indian state of Arunachal Pradesh, which China refers to as "Southern Tibet", or show its claims in the South China Sea, which overlap with those of several other countries in the region.

In the statement sent to the Global Times, Gap said the T-shirt has been pulled off shelves in the Chinese market and destroyed.

Gap made an apology for one of its shirts featuring a map of China that upset China's internet users.

"Gap Inc. respects the sovereignty and territorial integrity of China", Gap said on its Weibo account.

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U.S. clothes giant GAP said it was "extremely sorry" for selling a T-shirt with an "incomplete" map of China, after it was accused of being disrespectful to the country's territorial sovereignty. The shirt could not be found on Gap websites and it wasn't clear whether it was still being sold in shops in some countries.

In January, Australia's Qantas Airways changed its website classification of Taiwan and Hong Kong from separate countries to Chinese territories, blaming its earlier approach on an "oversight". Each of the companies has subsequently apologized.

Other US companies which have issued apologies for similar incidents include Delta Air Lines and Marriott International Inc.

The White House in early May called Chinese demands, that over 30 global airlines including a few in the USA, remove from their websites any data that might suggest that Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan were not part of China, as being Orwellian nonsense. Last year, German carmaker Audi was in hot water for omitting Taiwan and parts of western China on a map used at their annual meeting, while Mercedes-Benz apologized in February for quoting the Dalai Lama, the exiled spiritual leader of Tibet, on Instagram.

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